Sunday, 21 August 2016

(226) Atherley of Landguard Manor and Northbrook House

The Atherley family were prominent in Southampton from the late 17th century to the mid 19th century, and may always have been associated with the brewing industry. Arthur Atherley, who appears in the city records in the 1660s and 1670s, was a maltster. His son, Arthur Atherley (1664-1741) was twice mayor of the city and he and his sons Arthur and Richard are described simply as merchants, but in the next generation Arthur Atherley (1746-1820) re-established the connection with brewing - if it had been broken - when he married one of the daughters of Sir John Carter (1741-1808) of Portsmouth, a partner in Pike's Brewery in that town. Atherley described himself as brewer and distiller in his will and was evidently a partner in Pike's brewery himself as well as having interests in Southampton.

William Pike (1691-1777), the founder of Pike's Brewery, had invested the profits of his mercantile career in the purchase of estates in the Isle of Wight. The largest of his purchases took place in 1753, when he bought the manors of Luccombe, Appleford, Cleaveland and Landguard in Bonchurch, Godshill, Newchurch and Brading from the Knight family. At his death Pike left two daughters, Susannah (the wife of John Carter) and Ann (the wife of Thomas Bonham), who inherited the brewery and estates amounting to some 5,730 acres. Between them the sisters had nine children, and the subsequent history of the Pike estate is somewhat obscure, as various members of the Bonham and Carter families are found dealing with it in the late 18th century, and it may well have been managed collectively rather than being apportioned between the heirs. A new polite front was built at Landguard Manor at this time, but it is not clear that it was used as a residence by any members of the family; it may have been let or occupied by the family's agent.

What is clear is that after the death of Sir John Carter in 1808, control of much of the estate passed to Arthur Atherley (1746-1820) and then to his son, Arthur Atherley (1772-1844). The younger Arthur was educated at Eton and Cambridge and then at Lincoln's Inn, and was the first of his family to receive this sort of gentleman's education. Although he may have had interests in some of the family's business enterprises, he was not directly engaged in them, and he lived as a gentleman of independent means. He was politically active as a strong Foxite Whig, and served three times as MP for Southampton, although even with the Duke of Norfolk's support his efforts to get elected for Arundel (Sussex), where he lived, were unsuccessful. His younger brother George Atherley (1782-1856) was not sent to university, but into one of the local Southampton banks, where he rapidly became a partner in the firm of Atherley & Fall. George's son, George Atherley (1818-83) followed him into the bank, but in the 1850s he bought Northbrook House at Bishop Waltham with a small acreage, so this branch of the family eventually acquired its own landed property too. However, in the next generation, Maj. Evelyn George Hammond Atherley (1852-1935) sold it soon after inheriting it.

Despite their large holdings in the Isle of Wight, supplemented by an estate at Shirley (Hants) which they acquired before 1820, the senior branch of the Atherleys did not rush to settle on their estates either. Arthur Atherley (1772-1844) was succeeded by his eldest son, Rev. Arthur Atherley (1794-1857), who was vicar of Heavitree in Exeter (Devon) and also held a prebend in Chichester Cathedral. It was only when his son, Lt-Col. Francis Henry Atherley (1831-97), who married a daughter of the Earl of Suffolk & Berkshire, inherited, that Landguard Manor seems to have become a regular family residence, and in 1878 the house was substantially enlarged and remodelled. It passed to Col. Atherley's only son, Arthur Harry Howard Atherley (1865-1917), whose widow sold it in 1926.



Landguard Manor, Shanklin, Isle of Wight


Landguard Manor: the five-bay 18th century south front.

The earliest part of the house today is the late 18th century five bay south front of red brick with stone quoins, which has recently been defaced by the addition of a debased classical porch. This brick front was apparently an addition to an earlier 17th century stone house of the Knight family, which was demolished in 1878 and replaced by the present large, irregular, stone-built neo-Jacobean range. 


Landguard Manor: the east front of the 1878 range, from an old postcard.

The extension has a richly decorated balustraded porch, round-arched at the front and sides, which was probably added in 1906. To the west there is another wing with an arched loggia. Inside, there is a two-storey colonnaded hall, with a well staircase, also of 1906.

In the mid 20th century the house became a holiday centre for the Co-operative Holidays Association, and it is now operated as a wedding and events venue.

Descent: Edward Knight (d. 1612)... Anne Knight, sold 1753 to William Pike (1691-1777) of Portsmouth;to daughters, wives of John Carter and Thomas Bonham; to Sir John Carter (1741-1808); to son-in-law, Arthur Atherley (1746-1820); to son, Arthur Atherley (1772-1844); to son, Rev. Arthur Atherley (1794-1857); to son, Lt-Col. Francis Henry Atherley (1831-97), who remodelled it in 1878; to son, Arthur Harry Howard Atherley (1865-1917); to widow, Eleanor Gertrude Atherley (née Lumsden) (1872-1952), later wife of Maj-Gen. Albemarle Bertie Edward Cator DSO (d. 1932), who sold 1926... Co-operative Holidays Association (fl. 1949)



Northbrook House, Bishops Waltham, Hampshire


Northbrook House, Bishops Waltham: garden front.

A two-storey late 18th century Georgian stuccoed house, extended in the early 19th century and later. The south-east facing main elevation is of eight bays, grouped 3-3-2, with a Doric porch on the third bay, oddly placed to the left of the breakfront. The front has a plinth, first-floor plat band, moulded cornice and coping to parapet. The garden front is similarly two-storeyed and stuccoed, but lacks the plat band, and has the parapet swept down over the central six bays. The south end elevation is tile-hung and at the north end a large wing projects to the west. Inside there are some early 19th century fireplaces, ceiling cornices, and panelled doors in architraves. The house became offices for Droxford Rural District Council in the mid 20th century and was recently converted into flats.

Descent: Thomas Grant; to widow (d. 1837), who let to tenants including Earl of Huntingdon (c.1822), Adm. E.G. Colpoys (d. c.1834), N.W. Kindersley (d. 1844), and Col. Saunderson (fl. 1847)...sold in 1850s to George Atherley (1818-83); to son, Maj. Evelyn George Hammond Atherley (b. 1852)...Droxford Rural District Council...



Atherley family of Landguard Manor



Atherley, Arthur (1746-1820). Son of Arthur Atherley of Southampton and his wife, baptised 27 December 1746 at All Saints, Southampton. Brewer and distiller at Portsmouth. Mayor of Southampton, 1783-84 and 1797-98; JP for Southampton; elected a Burgess of Portsmouth, 1772, 1782. He married, 12 February 1769 at St Thomas, Portsmouth (Hants), Susanna (1748-1802), daughter of Sir John Carter, and had issue:
(1) Arthur Atherley (1772-1844) (q.v.);
(2) John Carter Atherley (1774-95), baptised 20 March 1774 at All Saints, Southampton; an officer in the Coldstream Guards (Ensign, 1792; Lt., 1794; Capt., 1794); died unmarried in Holland, 22 January 1795;
(3) William Atherley (1777-78), baptised 22 August 1777 at All Saints, Southampton; died in infancy and was buried at Southampton, 3 March 1778;
(4) William Atherley (b. & d. 1780), baptised 8 August 1780 at All Saints, Southampton; died in infancy and was buried at Southampton, 24 September 1780;
(5) George Atherley (1782-1856) [for whom see Atherley family of Northbrook House, below];
(6) Susannah Atherley (1788-1828), baptised 8 August 1788 at All Saints, Southampton; married, 7 August 1816 at Southampton, Rear-Adm. Frederick Jennings Thomas (1786-1855), younger son of Sir John Thomas, 5th bt., of Wenvoe Castle (Glam), and had issue three sons and one daughter; died 23 July 1828.
He lived at Southampton and accumulated property in Hampshire (Shirley) and the Isle of Wight, including Landguard Manor which he acquired through his marriage.
He was buried at All Saints, Southampton, 4 March 1820; his will was proved in the PCC, 9 May 1820. His wife was buried at All Saints, Southampton, 26 February 1802.


Arthur Atherley at Eton
by Sir Thomas Lawrence.
Atherley, Arthur (1772-1844). Son of Arthur Atherley (d. 1820), banker, of Southampton and his wife, Susanna, daughter of John Carter of Portsmouth (Hants), born 1772. Educated at Eton (Capt. of Ad Montem Club), Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1790) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1791). An officer in the Winchester Suburbs Volunteers (Lt., 1803; Capt., 1804; Maj. commanding, 1807). Whig MP for Southampton, 1806-07, 1812-18, 1831-34, and stood unsuccessfully for Arundel in 1819 and 1820; in politics he was a friend and supporter of Charles James Fox who described himself as 'an uncompromising friend of Reform'. JP for Hampshire, Sussex and Southampton. He married, 2/16 June 1793, Lady Louisa (1768-1819), daughter of William John Kerr, 5th Marquess of Lothian, and had issue:
(1) Rev. Arthur Atherley (1796-1857) (q.v.);
(2) Louisa Mary Atherley (1798-1864), baptised 12 July 1798 at St Swithin, Winchester (Hants); died unmarried in Bath, 8 November 1864; her will was proved 3 January 1865 (effects under £14,000);
(3) Mary Atherley (1799-1830?), baptised 23 August 1799 at St Swithun, Winchester (Hants); perhaps the lady of this name who was buried at Portsmouth, 31 January 1830;
(4) Sydney Charlotte Anne Atherley (c.1800-52); married, 19 November 1827 at Arundel (Sussex), as his second wife, Col. Samuel Long; died aged 52 and was buried at Norwood Cemetery (Surrey), 13 July 1852;
(5) Amelia Calles Montague Atherley (1801-04), baptised 22 October 1801; died young and was buried 17 October 1804 at All Saints, Southampton;
(6) General Mark Kerr Atherley (1804-84), baptised 17 May 1804 at Winchester Cathedral; an officer in the army (Ensign, 1823; Lt., 1825; Capt., 1828; Maj., 1841; Lt-Col., 1849; Col., 1854; Maj-Gen. 1864; Lt-Gen., 1872; Gen., 1877); Colonel of the Gordon Highlanders, 1880-84; married, 3 April 1847 at Belturbet (Cavan), Martha J. Bowen (c.1830-1906) and had issue two sons and seven daughters; died in London, 11 March 1884 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 19 March 1884; his will was proved 21 April 1884 (effects £3,676);
(7) Rev. Henry Fox Atherley (1806-c.1874), born 7 January 1806; educated at Denham (Bucks) and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1824; BA 1828; MA 1831); ordained deacon, 1829 and priest, 1830; curate of Upper Beeding (Sussex), 1846-50; vicar of Staverton (Devon), 1850-74; married, 11 October 1831 at Romsey (Hants), Frances Heathcote (c.1811-58) and had issue one son; died 2 August 1874; his will proved 28 August 1874 (effects under £8,000);
(6) Matilda Mary D'Arcy Atherley (1809-50), baptised 10 August 1809 at St. Lawrence, Winchester; died unmarried at Bath, 17 May 1850; her will was proved 27 June 1850.
He inherited his father's property in Hampshire (Shirley) and the Isle of Wight (Luccombe in Bonchurch and Landguard Manor) but lived at Arundel, and retired to Brighton after leaving politics in 1834.
He died 1 October 1844 at the Tower House, Brighton (Sussex) and was buried at All Saints, Southampton; his will was proved 19 November 1844. His wife died 23 June 1819.

Atherley, Rev. Arthur (1794-1857). Eldest son of Arthur Atherley (1772-1844) and his wife Lady Louisa, daughter of William John Kerr, 5th Marquess of Lothian, born 8 February 1794. Educated at Southampton and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1812; MA 1818); ordained deacon and priest, 1818; vicar of Heavitree, Exeter (Devon), 1820-57; prebendary of Chichester Cathedral, 1833-57. He was elected a burgess of Portsmouth in 1817. He married, 8 November 1821, Amelia Elizabeth (1796-1875), daughter of Richard Dawkins, Commissioner of Excise, and had issue:
(1) Arthur Pelham Atherley (1822-47), baptised 19 August 1822; an officer in the army (ensign, 1840-42); married, 3? March 1846 at Abergavenny (Monmouths.), Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of John Thompson; died at Bath, 20 November 1847;
(2) Louisa Atherley (1824-1908), baptised 2 September 1824; married, 2 January 1845, Charles Davers Osborn (1819-46) of Heavitree, second son of Sir John Osborn, 5th bt., of Chicksands Priory (Beds); died in London, 30 April 1908; will proved 26 August 1908 (estate £1,507);
(3) Arabella Jane Catherine Atherley (1827-1919), baptised 3 March 1827; died unmarried in London, 23 April 1919 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 25 April 1919; her will was proved 31 May 1919 (estate £3,195);
(4) Henrietta Frances Isabella Atherley (1829-1919), baptised 15 June 1829; died unmarried in London, 2 April 1919 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 8 April 1919; her will was proved 31 May 1919 (estate £1,728);
(5) Lt-Col. Francis Henry Atherley (1831-97) (q.v.);
(6) Capt. Edward Gambier Eliot Atherley (1834-98), born 18 December 1834; an officer in the army (Ensign, 1852; Lt., 1854; Capt 1860); died at Puckeridge (Herts), 10 October 1898 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 21 October 1898;
(7) Sydney Kerr Buller Atherley (1837-78), baptised 28 November 1837; educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1855); married, 3 April 1877, Georgina Louisa (c.1831-1919), daughter of Grenville L. Berkeley but had no issue; died 27 February 1878.
He inherited his father's property in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, including Landguard Manor. After his death his widow moved to 33 Eaton Place, London with her unmarried and widowed daughters.
He died in London, 14 February 1857; his will was proved 27 May 1857. His widow died in London, 20 January 1875; her will was proved 15 February 1875 (estate under £8,000).


F.H. Atherley 1831-97
Some rights reserved.
Atherley, Lt-Col. Francis Henry (1831-97). Second son of Rev. Arthur Atherley (1794-1857) of Heavitree, Exeter (Devon) and his wife Amelia Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Dawkins, Commissioner of Excise, born 30 May 1831. An officer in the 40th Regiment and later the Rifle Brigade (2nd Lt., 1849; Lt., 1850; Capt., 1854; Maj. 1858, retired 1858); and of the Isle of Wight Volunteer Battalion (Maj., 1870; Lt-Col., 1871; T/Col., 1881; retired 1891); JP for Hampshire, 1869. He married, 18 June 1863 at Charlton (Wilts), Lady Isabel Julia Elizabeth (1831-1910), daughter of Charles John Howard, 17th Earl of Suffolk & Berkshire, and had issue:
(1) Arthur Harry Howard Atherley (1865-1917) (q.v.).
He inherited his father's estates in Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, including Landguard Manor, Shanklin (Isle of Wight) which he enlarged and remodelled in 1878.
He died 31 March 1897 and was buried at Southampton Cemetery; will proved 20 August 1897 (effects £5,916). His widow died 8 November 1910; administration of her goods was granted 2 February 1911 (estate £1,524).

Atherley, Arthur Harry Howard (1865-1917). Only recorded son of Lt-Col. Francis Henry Atherley (1831-97) of Landguard Manor, Shanklin (Isle of Wight) and his wife Lady Isabel Julia Elizabeth, daughter of Charles John Howard, 17th Earl of Suffolk & Berkshire, born 25 May 1865. JP and DL for Hampshire. In 1905 he gave the site for Shanklin Cottage Hospital. He married, 25 September 1902 at St Mary, Carden Place, Aberdeen, Eleanor Gertrude (1872-1952), daughter of James Forbes Lumsden of Johnstone House, Aberdeen, and had issue:
(1) Isabel Eleanor Evelyn Atherley (1904-64), born 7 March 1904; married 1st, 4 June 1925 at St Peter, Eaton Square, London, Edward Geoffrey Pease, racehorse trainer, son of Leonard Pease of Beverley, and had issue two daughters; married 2nd, Jul-Sep 1946, as his second wife, Arthur Turberville Smith-Bingham (1906-88), son of Brig-Gen. Oswald Buckley Smith-Bingham CMG ; died 28 April 1964; her will was proved 23 October 1964 (estate £13,667);
(2) Helen Myrtle Dorothy (nickname Flash) Atherley (1905-76), born 5 August 1905; travelled extensively to exotic countries with her first husband, who was a big game hunter; married 1st, 14 October 1926 at the Guards Chapel, London, Lt-Col. Edward Orlando Kellett MP (c.1902-43) and had issue one daughter (later Lady Holderness); married 2nd, 26 February 1946, Hon. William Johnston McGowan (1909-77), second son of Harry Duncan McGowan, 1st Baron McGowan, and had issue another daughter (later Lady Hindlip); died 16 March 1976; will proved 23 August 1976 (estate £8,839).
He inherited Landguard Manor from his father in 1897. At his death it passed to his widow, who sold it in 1926.
He died 4 July 1917 and was buried at Shanklin (Isle of Wight); his will was proved 6 October 1917 (estate £17,512). His widow married 2nd, Apr-Jun 1920, Col. Albemarle Bertie Edward Cator DSO, son of Albemarle Cator of Woodbastwick Hall (Norfk); she died 25 January 1952; administration of her goods granted 7 May 1952 to her younger daughter (estate £1,631).



Atherley family of Northbrook House


Atherley, George (1782-1856). Younger son of Arthur Atherley (1746-1820), banker, of Southampton and his wife, Susanna, daughter of Sir John Carter, kt., of Portsmouth (Hants), baptised at Southampton, 26 December 1782. Partner in Atherley & Fall, bankers, of Southampton. Mayor of Southampton, 1816-17, 1821-22; Chairman of the Hampshire Reform Association, 1835. He married, 28 February 1814 at St Thomas, Winchester (Hants), Fanny (1782-1868), daughter of Peter Gauntlett of Winchester, and had issue:
(1) Selina Atherley (1817-99), born 10 March 1817; married, 20 June 1843 at Southampton, Capt. John Henry Forrest (c.1816-1901), Chief Constable of Nottinghamshire and later of Hampshire, and had issue seven sons and four daughters; died 3 September 1899;
(2) George Atherley (1818-83) (q.v.);
(3) Rev. Arthur Gauntlett Atherley (1822-95), baptised at Southampton, 1 August 1822; educated at Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1841; BA 1845); ordained deacon 1847 and priest 1848; curate of Biddestone (Wilts) (c.1851-55); perpetual curate of Alderton (Wilts), 1859-64; minister of Hartham (Wilts) Chapel, 1864-80; married, 25 May 1852 at St Mary, Paddington (Middx), Georgiana (1824-79), daughter of Col. William Forrest, and had issue five sons and five daughters; died 4 September 1895; will proved 14 October 1895 (effects £39,618).
He lived at Southampton.
He died at Southampton, 13/15 March 1856 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 20 March 1856; his will was proved 11 April 1856. His widow died in Winchester, 12 July 1868 and was buried at Southampton Old Cemetery, 17 July 1868; her will was proved 11 September 1868 (effects under £3,000).

Atherley, George (1818-83). Only recorded son of George Atherley (d. 1856) of Southampton and his wife, born 31 October 1818. Educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1837). Partner in Atherley & Fall (later Maddison & Atherley), bankers, from 1843, and also in the Southampton & Hampshire Bank. JP and DL for Hampshire. Deputy Chairman of the Bishops Waltham Charity Trustees; President of the Bishops Waltham Reading Society. He married, 27 November 1851 at St Michael, Pimlico, London, Ellen (c.1831-82), second daughter of Arthur Frederick esq., and had issue:
(1) Evelyn George Hammond Atherley (1852-1935) (q.v.);

(2) Maud Elizabeth Atherley (1856-64), born 21 May 1856; died young, 26 October 1864.
He lived at Chilworth Manor near Romsey until he purchased Northbrook House, Bishop Waltham (Hants) with about 37 acres in the late 1850s.
He died at Southampton, 19 April 1883; his will was proved 18 July 1883 (effects £59,539). His wife died 31 December 1882.

Atherley, Maj. Evelyn George Hammond (1852-1935). Only recorded son of George Atherley of Northbrook House, Bishop Waltham (Hants) and his wife Ellen, second daughter of Arthur Frederick esq., born 9 September 1852. An officer in the Royal Regiment of Horse Guards (Lt., 1875; Capt., 1883; Major, 1889; retired 1894); he played polo for his regiment and was part of the team which won the Hurlingham Champion Cup in 1876. He married, 11 February 1888, Helen (1864-1922), third daughter of Hugh Lindsay Antrobus of Lower Cheam House, Surrey, but had no issue.
He inherited Northbrook House from his father in 1883 but probably sold it soon afterwards. He later rented Coughton Court (Warks) (c.1901), Attingham Park (Shropshire) (c.1904), Hampton Court (Herefs) (c.1908) and Croft Castle (Herefs) (c.1922) for short periods, and had various addresses in London.
He died 15 February 1935; his will was proved 24 April 1935 (estate £228,012). His wife died in London, 22 November 1922; her will was proved 21 June 1923 (estate £14,900).


Sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1898, i, pp. 39-40; Burke's Landed Gentry, 1925, p. 46; Sir N. Pevsner & D. Lloyd, The buildings of England: Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, 1967, p. 109; D.W. Lloyd & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: The Isle of Wight, 2006, p. 269.


Location of archives


Atherley of Landguard Manor: deeds and papers, 1862-86 [Southampton Archives, D/MW Box 41]


Coat of arms


None recorded, although Arthur Atherley in the 18th century and Lt-Col. F.H. Atherley and his son in the early 20th century used the same arms as the Adderley family of Hams Hall, Barons Norton.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Can anyone explain the descent of Landguard Manor from William Pike (1691-1777) to Arthur Atherley (1746-1820)? Did Atherley buy out the interests of others who were entitled to a share in the property?
  • Can anyone provide fuller information about the descent of Landguard Manor or Northbrook House in the 20th century after they were sold by the Atherley family?
  • Does anyone know what happened to Edward Geoffrey Pease (fl. 1925-29), the first husband of Isabel Eleanor Evelyn Atherley (1904-64)? I can find no record of his death, or of a divorce, before she remarried in 1946.



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 21st August 2016.

Wednesday, 17 August 2016

(225) Atcherley of Marton

Atcherley of Marton
The Atcherley family can be traced at Stanwardine in the parish of Baschurch (Shropshire) from the 14th century and in 1511 a member of this family, Roger Atcherley (d. 1521), who had become a London merchant, was made Lord Mayor of London and knighted. Their emergence into the landed gentry dates, however, from the 17th century, when Thomas Atcherley (d. 1658), son of Richard Atcherley of Stanwardine, bought a property at Marton in the parish of Myddle and established a successful tannery there. With the property came a house where Thomas lived, which had formerly been occupied by Mr. Lloyd Peirce; this was presumably the predecessor of Marton Hall. Thomas later acquired property elsewhere in Shropshire and at the time of his death (when he had probably retired from business) he was living at Wolverley in the parish of Wem. Thomas' son and successor, Thomas Atcherley (1609-81) continued to operate the tannery and also dealt in timber, but seems to have been the last of the family to engage in trade. He is said to have rebuilt the house at Marton, perhaps in 1666. He also invested in further land acquisitions in Shropshire and especially at Cilcewydd and Fron in Montgomeryshire. At his death he left his elder son, Andrew Atcherley (1649-1710), the Montgomeryshire property, which he therefore probably regarded as his main estate; his younger son, Richard Atcherley (1653-82) inherited Marton, but when Richard died without male issue Marton also came to Andrew.

Like his father, Andrew Atcherley left two surviving sons and he divided his property between them. The elder, Richard Atcherley (1679-1750), who was evidently established at Marton in his father's lifetime, received that estate, while the younger, Andrew Atcherley (1686-1730) inherited the Forden estate in Montgomeryshire. Richard was probably responsible for building the Georgian wing of Marton Hall after he came into his inheritance. He again had two sons, but the elder, Thomas Atcherley (1704-38), died in his father's lifetime, so it was Richard's grandson, Richard Atcherley (1732-66), who inherited Marton in 1750.

Richard, whose first marriage to a shopkeeper's daughter from Kent looks like an unsanctioned mésalliance, produced a family by his second wife but died very young, leaving as heir his three-year-old son, Richard Atcherley (1763-1834), who married but died without issue. He bequeathed Marton Hall to his nephew, David Francis Jones (1783-1845), one of the Serjeants-at-law, on condition that he took the name Atcherley, which he did in 1834. Mr. Serjeant Atcherley produced a large family, and his eldest son, also David Francis Atcherley (1818-87) inherited Marton. The younger David married fairly late in life and produced only one child, a daughter, and at his death Marton therefore passed to his younger brother's son, Francis Robinson Hartland Atcherley (1865-95). F.R.H. Atcherley died young leaving only a daughter, and his widow quickly married again to Walter Vernon of Hilton Park (Staffs). Atcherley's daughter and heiress, Muriel Hope Atcherley (1890-1978) was therefore not brought up at Marton, and when she married and came of age in 1911 she sold the estate, bring to an end nearly three hundred years of family ownership. The story of her subsequent life in Kenya and South Africa is well told on the family genealogical blog, to which I am generally indebted for much of the information in this post. If every landed family had such an assiduous chronicler, there would be little need for my labours!



Marton Hall, Myddle, Shropshire


Marton Hall in about 1900, from an old postcard.

The house is said to have been rebuilt in the mid 17th century for Thomas Atcherley (c.1610-81), but by the time the photograph above was taken the house was an L-shaped, two and three-storey building, apparently mostly of later date. The three-storey shorter wing on the right could perhaps have been 17th century in origin, but if so it had been re-fenestrated and re-roofed later. The longer wing, with a modillion cornice and a pediment that incorporated a chimney, was probably basically early to mid 18th century, but had been given later plate-glass windows and a variety of incongruous Victorian bay windows.


Marton Hall: as rebuilt in 1913-14 by J.D. Coleridge,

After the Atcherley family sold Marton in c.1911 to Capt. W.S. Gosling, this architecturally undistinguished house was rebuilt in 1913-14 by John Duke Coleridge (1879-1934), who had worked briefly in Lutyens' office in 1900-01. He produced a comfortably-proportioned Tudor-style house built of squared, snecked red sandstone that stands on a new site a little further from the road than the old building. Some materials from the old building are said to have been reused in the new house, including an oak panelled room and a cupboard dated 1666.

Descent: sold 1622 to Thomas Atcherley (d. 1658); to son, Thomas Atcherley (1609-81); to son, Richard Atcherley (1652-82); to brother, Andrew Atcherley (1649-1709); to son, Richard Atcherley (1679-1750); to grandson, Richard Atcherley (1732-66); to son, Richard Atcherley (1763-1834); to nephew, David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1783-1845); to son, David Francis Atcherley (1818-87); to nephew, Francis Robinson Hartland Atcherley (1865-95); to daughter, Muriel Hope Atcherley (1890-1978), later wife of Henry Hemsted MD (d. 1945) and Charles Edward Stuart-Prince (b. 1893), who sold c.1911 to Capt. William Sullivan Gosling (1869-1952); sold after his death to William Lewis Richards Gwilt (b. 1915).


Atcherley family of Marton


Atcherley, Thomas (d. 1658). Said to have been the son of Richard Atcherley of Stanwardine in Baschurch, born about 1585. Tanner. Churchwarden of Myddle in 1608. He married 1st, Elizabeth [surname unknown] (d. 1612), 2nd, 17 June 1612 at Myddle, Jane (1589-1627), daughter of Edward Hinks of Burlton, and 3rd, Anne (d. 1660), daughter or widow of Nicholas Gough of Wolverley, and had issue:
(1.1) Thomas Atcherley (1609-81) (q.v.);
(2.1) Eliza Atcherley (1615-73), baptised at Myddle, 1 June 1615; probably died young;
(2.2) Elizabeth Atcherley (b. 1618), baptised at Myddle, 11 October 1618; married John Chetwood of Whitchurch (Shropshire) and had issue six children; buried at Whitchurch, 20 June 1673;
(2.3) Mary Atcherley (1623-62), baptised at Myddle, 2 February 1622/3; married, c.1652, Roger Griffiths (d. 1699), alderman (and later Mayor) of Shrewsbury (who m2, 24 September 1663 at Fitz (Shropshire), Elinor Heynes (d. 1703)), and had issue two sons and another child who died unbaptised; buried at St Chad, Shrewsbury, 3 October 1662;
(2.4) Richard Atcherley (1625-72), baptised at Myddle, 21 August 1625; married, 20 February 1650, Susannah Brooks (d. 1714), and had issue three sons and five daughters; buried at Wem, 6 April 1672.
He also had an illegitimate son by Jane, daughter of 'old Edge':
(X1) Thomas Atcherley alias Edge (1617-79) of Twyford and West Felton (Shropshire), baptised at Myddle, 5 January 1617/8; married, 24 November 1655 at Myddle, Mary (b. 1634), daughter of Richard Groome of Myddle, and had issue two sons and five daughters; buried at West Felton, 16 December 1679.
He bought the Marton estate in 1622. He acquired property elsewhere in Shropshire and lived latterly at Wolverley in the parish of Wem.
He was buried at Wem, 24 February 1657/8. His first wife was buried at Myddle, 15 January 1611/2. His second wife was buried 15 April 1627.

Atcherley, Thomas (1609-81). Only son of Thomas Atcherley (d. 1658) of Marton Hall and his first wife, Elizabeth [surname unknown], baptised at Myddle, 31 December 1609. A tanner and dealer in timber. He married, 14 July 1642 at St Chad, Shrewsbury, Eleanor (d. c.1687), daughter of Robert Griffiths, alderman of Shrewsbury, and had issue:
(1) Ann Atcherley (1643-1717), born 31 July 1643*; married 1st, 14 July 1665 at St. Alkmund, Shrewsbury, Owen Clutton (1642-79) of Malpas (Cheshire) and had issue seven children; married 2nd, 29 October 1684 at Malpas, Jonathan Bradley; buried at Malpas, 25 December 1717;
(2) Sarah Atcherley (1645-64), born 6 September 1645*; died unmarried and was buried at Myddle, 4 September 1664;
(3) Thomas Atcherley (1647-73), born 14 February* and baptised at Myddle, 28 February 1646/7; draper in Shrewsbury; died unmarried and without issue, 1673; will proved in the PCC, 17 December 1673;
(4) Andrew Atcherley (1649-1709) (q.v.);
(5) Eleanor Atcherley (b. 1650), born 16 November 1650*; married 1st, 29 January 1674/5 at Myddle, Nathaniel Kynaston (d. 1678) of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain (Montgomerys.) and 2nd, Rev. Griffith Lloyd (d. 1696), vicar of Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain, but died without issue;
(6) Richard Atcherley (1652-82), born 2 October 1652*; inherited Marton Hall from his father in 1681; married, 17 June 1680 at Hodnet (Shropshire), Margaret (1657-1734) (who m2, Thomas Harwood (1661-1739) of Tern Hall and had five further children), daughter of Rowland Hill of Hawkestone, and had issue one daughter; buried at Myddle, 29 December 1682;
(7) Jane Atcherley (1654-1719), born 19 March 1653/4; married, 10 January 1681/2, Thomas Cole (d. 1729) of Gagden, Shrewsbury (Shropshire), but died without issue and was buried 24 April 1719;
(8) Mary Atcherley (1657-1702), born 29 September 1657*; married, 14 July 1683, Charles Chambre (1662-1731) (who m2, 23 July 1703, Ann (d. 1730), daughter of [forename unknown] Roe and widow of Charles Heath), son of Arthur Chambre of Burlton and had issue four children, who all died without issue; buried 11 March 1701/2 at Loppington.
He inherited the Marton Hall estate from his father and rebuilt the house (possibly in 1666, the date on a fitted cupboard removed to the new Marton Hall in 1914). He purchased property elsewhere in Shropshire and Montgomeryshire. At his death his Montgomeryshire estates passed to his elder surviving son, Andrew, and Marton Hall to his younger son, Richard.
He was buried 6 August 1681. His widow's will was proved 13 April 1687.
* Dates from a family bible quoted on www.atcherley.org.uk/wp/trees/thomas-of-marton/.

Atcherley, Andrew (1649-1710). Second but eldest surviving son of Thomas Atcherley (1609-81) and his wife Eleanor, daughter of Alderman Robert Griffiths of Shrewsbury, born 7 April 1649. He married, 19 November 1670 at Forden (Montgomerys.), Jane Lloyd (1648-1720) of Letty Gonworch (Montgomerys.) and had issue:
(1) Thomas Atcherley (1671-91), baptised at Forden, 8/31 August 1671; died unmarried and without issue and was buried at Forden, 20 March 1691;
(2) Sarah Atcherley (1673-1745), baptised at Forden, 24 August 1673; married, 7 April 1703 at St. Alkmund, Shrewsbury, Henry Phillips (1678-1712) of Pontesbury, and had issue five children; buried at Pontesbury, 21 January 1744/5;
(3) Jane Atcherley (1674-1711?), baptised at Forden, 13 February 1674; married, 6 June 1705 at Uffington (Shropshire), Samuel Roofe, and had issue four children; probably buried 7 September 1711 at Uffington;
(4) Ellinor Atcherley (1677-93), baptised at Forden, 7 June 1677; died young and was buried at Forden, 16 April 1693;
(5) twin, Isaac Atcherley (b. & d. 1678); buried at Forden, 24 September 1678;
(6) twin, Jacob Atcherley (b. & d. 1678); buried at Forden, 24 September 1678;
(7) Richard Atcherley (1679-1750) (q.v.);
(8) Mary Atcherley (b. 1681), baptised at Forden, 17 April 1681; according to an old pedigree in Shropshire Archives she is said to have married a 'Mr Kynnerley';
(9) Roger Atcherley (1682-86), baptised 13 January 1682/3; died young and was buried 23 August 1686;
(10) Anne Atcherley (b. 1684), baptised at Forden, 16 February 1683/4; according to an old pedigree in Shropshire Archives she is said to have married a 'Mr Jones';
(11) Andrew Atcherley (1686-1730) of Cilcewydd, Forden, baptised at Forden, 8 May 1686; inherited his father's property at Forden; died unmarried and was buried at Forden, 2 October 1730;
(12) Elizabeth Atcherley (b. 1688), baptised at Forden, 19 October 1688; according to an old pedigree in Shropshire Archives she is said to have married a 'Mr Davies';
(13) Frances Atcherley (b. 1689), baptised 9 November 1689; married, 13 February 1709 at Forden, Griffith Griffiths (d. 1742) and had issue one daughter.
He inherited his father's property at Forden (Montgomerys.) in 1681 and Marton Hall from his younger brother in 1682. He appears to have lived chiefly at Forden.
He was buried 9 February 1709/10; his will was proved in the PCC, 6 May 1710. His widow was buried at Forden, 9 August 1720.

Atcherley, Richard (1679-1750). Second but eldest surviving son of Andrew Atcherley (1649-1710) and his wife Jane Lloyd of Letty Gonworch (Montgomerys.), baptised 1 October 1679 at Forden (Montgomerys.). Churchwarden of Myddle, 1723. He married, 28 January 1702/3 at Battlefield (Shropshire), Elizabeth (1681-1755), daughter of Edward Lloyd of Leaton in Pimhill (Shropshire), and had issue:
(1) Thomas Atcherley (1704-38) (q.v.);
(2) Richard Atcherley (1705-66) of Wem, baptised 30 October 1705 at Myddle; died unmarried and without issue, 12 April, and was buried 16 April 1766 at Myddle, where is commemorated on a monument.
He inherited Marton Hall from his father in 1709 and may have built the Georgian wing of the house.
He died 11 May and was buried at Myddle, 15 May 1750. His widow was buried 28 July 1755.

Atcherley, Thomas (1704-38). Elder son of Richard Atcherley (1679-1750) and his wife Elizabeth Lloyd, baptised 6 April 1704. He married, 4 July 1722 at Acton (Cheshire), Dorothy (1704-92), daughter of Robert Whitney of Newhall (Cheshire) and had issue, with two other children who died young:
(1) Thomas Atcherley (1723-43), baptised at Wrenbury (Cheshire), 25 May 1723; died unmarried and was buried at Myddle, 27 July 1743;
(2) Jane Atcherley (c.1724-39); died young and was buried at Myddle, 16 March 1738/9;
(3) Elizabeth Atcherley (1726-88), baptised at Loppington (Shropshire), 3 June 1726; married 1st, 2 February 1748/9 at Myddle, Richard Palin (d. 1751) and had issue one son (who died without issue); married 2nd, 26 August 1762 at Prees (Shropshire), Richard Chambre (1722-1803) and had further issue two children (who died young); she died at Shrewsbury, 28 October and was buried at Wem (Shropshire), 3 November 1788;
(4) Dorothy Atcherley (1727-88), baptised at Loppington, 16 September 1727; died unmarried at Wem and was buried at Myddle, 16 March 1788;
(5) Richard Atcherley (b. & d. 1729), baptised at Loppington, 28 August 1729; died in infancy and was buried at the same place, 17 September 1729;
(6) Robert Atcherley (1731-58), baptised at Loppington, 8 January 1731; married, 14 December 1755 at Alberbury (Shropshire), Elizabeth Crump (1724-80) (who m2, 20 September 1773 at St Chad, Shrewsbury, Francis Lomax (d. 1782), surgeon, of Shrewsbury) but died without issue; buried at Myddle, 13 September 1758, where he is commemorated by a monument;
(7) Richard Atcherley (1732-66) (q.v.);
(8) Hugh Atcherley (1733-34), baptised at Loppington, 14 September 1733; died in infancy and was buried in the same place, 5 March 1733/4;
(9) John Atcherley (b. & d. 1735), baptised at Loppington, 15 March 1734/5; died in infancy and was buried in the same place, 25 March 1735;
(10) Thomasin Atcherley (1736-39), baptised at Myddle, 4 May or 1 July 1736; died young and was buried in the same place, 24 April 1739.
He lived at Loppington.
He died in the lifetime of his father, and was buried 29 December 1738. His widow lived at More (Shropshire) and was buried at Myddle, 29 May 1792.

Atcherley, Richard (1732-66). Fourth son of Thomas Atcherley (1704-38) and his wife Dorothy Whitney, baptised 24 February 1731/2. He married 1st, 9 September 1751 at Strood (Kent), Anne (b. 1727), daughter of Thomas Baker of Cobham (Kent), shopkeeper, and 2nd, 18 September 1760 at Loppington (Shropshire), Jane (1737-73), daughter of Rev. Thomas Hughes of Loppington, and had issue:
(1.1) Dorothy Atcherley (b. & d. 1753), baptised at St Andrew, Holborn (Middx), 30 March 1753; died in infancy and was buried in the same place, 15 May 1753;
(2.1) Dorothy Atcherley (b. 1761); baptised at Myddle, 14 July 1761; married, 28 May 1782 at Wem (Shropshire), Rev. Robert Taylor (1749-1833) and had issue eleven children;
(2.2) Jane Atcherley (1762-92) (q.v.);
(2.3) Richard Atcherley (1763-1834) (q.v.);
(2.4) Elizabeth Atcherley (1764-1840), born 21 December 1764 and baptised at Myddle, 1 January 1765; married, 4 March 1785 at Chester, Robert Corbett (1757-1826) of Liverpool and had issue six children; died 18 November at Arscott in Pontesbury (Shropshire), and was buried at Myddle, 24 November 1840;
(2.5) Thomas Atcherley (1766-1801), born 27 February 1766 and baptised at Myddle the following day; imprisoned for debt at Chester, 1794; died without issue, July 1801. 
He inherited Marton Hall from his grandfather in 1750.
He died at Marton, 22 April and was buried at Myddle, 26 April 1766, where he is commemorated on a monument. His first wife's date of death is unknown. His widow lived at Shrewsbury; she died 30 May and was buried at Myddle, 2 June 1773.

Atcherley, Richard (1763-1834). Elder son of Richard Atcherley (1732-66) and his second wife Jane Hughes of Loppington, baptised 15 October 1763. Articled clerk to Widdens, Potts & Leeke of Chester, solicitors, 1781, but does not seem to have pursued a legal career. He married, 26 May 1792 at Bosbury (Herefs), Elizabeth (1772-1836), daughter of Arthur Edwards of Bosbury, but had no issue.
He inherited Marton Hall from his father in 1766 and came of age in 1784. At his death it passed to his nephew, David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1783-1845).
He died 27 February and was buried at Myddle, 6 March 1834; his will was proved in the PCC, 24 April 1834. His widow died 27 September and was buried at Myddle, 4 October 1836, where she is commemorated on a monument.

Atcherley, Jane (1762-92). Second daughter of Richard Atcherley of Marton Hall and his wife Jane Hughes of Loppington, born 8 July and baptised 9 July 1762. She married, 2 July 1782 at Loppington, David Francis Jones (1757-1828), solicitor, of Chester and Cwmmau Hall, nr Hope (Flints.), son of David Jones of Cwmmau, and had issue:
(1) David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1783-1845) (q.v.).
She died 3 May 1792. Her husband married 2nd, 15 January 1795 at Whitchurch (Shropshire), Anne Sandland (1767-1829) and had further issue one son; he died 11 December and was buried at Hope (Flints.), 18 December 1828; administration of his goods with will annexed was granted in the PCC, 27 January 1829.

Jones (later Atcherley), David Francis (1783-1845). Son of David Francis Jones (1757-1828) of Cwmmau (Flints) and his wife Jane, daughter of Richard Atcherley of Marton Hall (Shropshire), born in Chester, 13 June 1783. Educated at Kings School, Chester, and Ludlow and Oswestry Grammar Schools; articled clerk to his father, 1800; an officer in the Royal Chester Volunteers (Lt., 1804); studied at Lincolns Inn (admitted 1805; called to bar, 1810). Barrister-at-law on the northern circuit; Recorder of Chester, 1814-20; Serjeant-at-law, 1827-45 and Attorney General of the Counties Palatine of Lancashire and Durham, 1835-45; DL for Flintshire; JP for Lancashire, Cheshire, Durham, Shropshire, Denbighshire and Flintshire. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society and of the Society of Antiquaries of London. A Tory in politics, he stood unsuccessfully for Parliament at York in 1837 and 1841. He assumed the name and arms of Atcherley in lieu of Jones by royal licence, 1834. He married, 29 May 1817 at St Andrew, Holborn (Middx), Anne Margaret (1788-1867), second daughter of James Topping KC of Whatcroft Hall (Cheshire) and had issue:
(1) David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1818-87) (q.v.);
(2) Jane Margaret Jones (later Atcherley) (1819-76), born 27 September 1819 and baptised 15 January 1820; died unmarried in London, 25 May 1876 and was buried at Kensal Green Cemetery;
(3) Emma Atcherley Jones (later Atcherley) (1820-82), born 27 December 1820 and baptised 13 June 1821; died unmarried at Rhyl (Flints.), 3 April and was buried at Hope (Flints.), 8 April 1882; will proved 2 August 1882 (effects £10,654);
(4) Elizabeth Hope Jones (later Atcherley) (1822-94), born 13 July 1822 and baptised 2 January 1823; died unmarried at Rhyl (Flints.), 4 January and was buried at Hope (Flints.), 9 January 1894; her will proved 31 March 1894 (effects £3,610);
(5) Lucy Catherine Jones (later Atcherley) (1823-99), born 29 August 1823 and baptised at Davenham (Cheshire), 8 October 1823; died unmarried in Cheltenham (Glos), 27 February and was buried at Hope (Flints.), 2 March 1899; will proved 8 April 1899 (effects £10,126);
(6) Francis Topping Jones (b. & d. 1824), born 19 June 1824; died in infancy and was buried at Davenham, 3 September 1824;
(7) Francis Robinson Jones (b. & d. 1825); died in infancy, 1 September and was buried at Davenham, 3 September 1825;
(8) Lt-Col. Francis Topping Jones (later Atcherley) (1827-75) (q.v.);
(9) Anne Eleanor Jones (later Atcherley) (1828-1905), born 18 November 1828 and baptised at Hope (Flints), 9 October 1830; died unmarried, 13 June and was buried at Hope (Flints), 16 June 1905; will proved 29 June 1905 (estate £10,086);
(10) Capt. William Atcherley Jones (later Atcherley) (1830-95), born 24 June 1830 and baptised at Hope (Flints), 9 October 1830; educated at Eton and Oriel College, Oxford (matriculated 1849; BA 1854); an officer in the army (Cornet, 1858; Lt. by 1861; Capt., 1865); died unmarried at Gresford (Denbighs.), 28 November and was buried at Hope, 2 December 1895; will proved 21 December 1895 (estate £7,596).
He inherited the Cwmmau estate in Flintshire from his father in 1828 and the Marton Hall estate from his maternal uncle in 1834.
He died in London, 6 July, and was buried at Hope (Flints), 15 July 1845; his will was proved in the PCC, 21 August 1845. His widow died at Leamington (Warks), 10 May, and was buried at Hope (Flints), 18 May 1867; her will was proved 16 November 1867 (effects under £3,000).

Atcherley, David Francis (1818-87). Eldest son of David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1783-1845) and his wife Anne Margaret, daughter of James Topping KC of Whatcroft Hall (Cheshire), born 1 July 1818 and baptised 3 July 1819. Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1836 but did not reside), University College, Oxford (matriculated 1836; BA 1842; MA 1864) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1840; called to bar, 1850). DL for Shropshire; JP for Shropshire and Flintshire. High Sheriff of Shropshire, 1864. He was active in the Shropshire Chamber of Agriculture, and in the 1870s he and his family and friends formed the "Marton Hall Opera Company", performing selections from popular opera classics for audiences in Shrewsbury and elsewhere. He married, 10 February 1866 at St George's, Hanover Square, London, Caroline Frances Amherst (1833-89), daughter of Courtenay Stacey of Sandling (Kent) and had issue:
(1) Rosamund Minnie Margaret Atcherley (1869-1960), born 21 July 1869; married, 23 December 1890, Edward France-Hayhurst (1868-1911), late of Whatcroft Hall (Cheshire), son of Rev. Thomas William Hamilton France-Hayhurst of Davenham Lodge (Cheshire), and had issue one son and one daughter; died 31 May 1960; will proved 2 December 1960 (estate £14,180).
He inherited the Marton Hall estate from his father in 1845. At his death it passed to his nephew, Francis Robinson Hartland Atcherley (1865-95).
He died 3 May and was buried at Myddle, 9 May 1887; his will was proved 2 August 1887 (effects £45,101). His widow died in Chelsea (Middx), 6 June and was buried at Myddle, 11 June 1889; her will was proved 7 November 1889 (effects £8,879).


Lt-Col. Francis Topping Atcherley.
Cropped from image: McCord Museum.
Some rights reserved.
Atcherley, Lt-Col. Francis Topping (1827-75). Second son of David Francis Jones (later Atcherley) (1783-1845) and his wife Anne Margaret, daughter of James Topping KC of Whatcroft Hall (Cheshire), born 17 June 1827 and was baptised at St George, Bloomsbury, 3 March 1828. An officer in 30th Regiment (Ensign, 1847; Lt., 1848; Capt., 1853; Brevet-Maj., 1855; retired as Lt. Col., 1865). He married 1st, 4 June 1863 at Toronto (Canada), Emma Arabella (d. 1871), daughter of Francis Harris Heward of Toronto, and 2nd, 21 November 1872 at Loppington (Shropshire), Jane Louisa (1832-1924), fourth daughter of Thomas Dickin of Loppington House, and had issue:
(1.1) Francis Robinson Hartland Atcherley (1865-95) (q.v.);
(1.2) Richard Topping Beverley Atcherley (1866-1909) of Stoke-upon-Tern (Shropshire), born 15 October 1866 at Prescott (Canada) and baptised 31 March 1867 at Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec (Canada); married, 18 September 1892, Caroline Mary Wynne (d. 1935), daughter of William Wynne Foulkes, and had issue two daughters; died 7 October 1909 at Chester;
(1.3) Arthur William Atcherley (b. & d. 1868), born 2 January 1868  at Brockville, Ontario (Canada); died in infancy, 14 August and was buried at Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec (Canada), 16 August 1868;
(1.4) Catherine Emma Grace Atcherley (1869-1938), born 21 July at Brockville, Ontario (Canada) and baptised 28 August 1869 at Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec (Canada); died unmarried, 1 June and was buried at Hope, 3 June 1938;
(1.5) Maj-Gen. Sir Llewellyn William Atcherley (1871-1954), born 1 March 1871 at Brockrilla (Canada); educated at Oundle School; an officer in the East Lancashire Regiment and Army Service Corps, c.1895-1905, 1914-18 (2nd Lt., 1890; Lt., 1891; Capt., 1898; Maj., 1900; Lt-Col., Maj-Gen); Chief Constable of Shropshire, 1906-08 and of West Riding of Yorkshire, 1908-19; HM Inspector of constabulary, 1919-36, 1940-46; appointed MVO, 1912; CMG, 1916; CVO, 1918 and knighted, 1925; married, 11 November 1897, Eleanor Frances (fl. 1954), younger daughter of Richard Micklethwait of Ardsley Hall, Yorks (WR) and had issue two sons and two daughters; died 17 February 1954; will proved 5 April 1954 (estate £12,557).
He died 16 June 1875 and was buried at Hope, 22 June 1875. His first wife died 16 March 1871 at Brockville, Ontario (Canada). His widow died in London, 5 August 1924.

Atcherley, Francis Robinson Hartland (1865-95). Eldest son of Lt-Col. Francis Topping Atcherley (1827-75) and his first wife, Emma Arabella, daughter of Francis Harris Heward of Toronto (Canada), born 8 January 1865 at Toronto (Canada). Educated at Karlsruhe (Germany). JP for Shropshire. Captain in 3rd battn, Shropshire Light Infantry. He married, 22 August 1889 at Altrincham (Cheshire), Esther Hodgson (1869-1957), daughter of John Mills of Northwold, Bowden (Cheshire), and had issue:
(1) Muriel Hope Atcherley (1890-1978) (q.v.).
He inherited the Marton Hall estate from his uncle in 1887 but lived at Stone House, Sutton in West Felton (Shropshire).
He died 16 November and was buried at Myddle, 19 November 1895; his will was proved 16 January 1896 (effects £7,427). His widow married 2nd, 15 September 1897 at Welsh Frankton (Shropshire), Walter Bertie William Vernon (1871-1948) of Hilton Park (Staffs) and had further issue one son; she died 21 March 1957.

Atcherley, Muriel Hope (1890-1978). Only child of Francis Robinson Hartland Atcherley (1865-95) and his wife Esther Hodgson, daughter of John Mills of Northwold, Bowden (Cheshire), born 6 July and baptised at West Felton, 7 August 1890. In 1912-13 she and her husband travelled to Kenya and in 1914 to Canada and the USA. In 1914 they moved to Cape Town (South Africa) where her husband joined the South African Medical Corps and they both joined the hospital ship Ebani, remaining with her after she was transferred to the Royal Army Medical Corps in 1915, but later transferring to HMHS Neuralia. After the end of the First World War they emigrated once more and became coffee-planters at Chestnut Farm, Ngong (Kenya) in 1920 until they moved to Naivasha (Kenya) in the mid-1930s. After the death of her first husband she returned to England and married again, going out first to Kenya once more but moving in the early 1950s to South Africa, where she and her husband became naturalised citizens in 1960. She married 1st, 29 March 1911 at St Margaret, Westminster (Middx), Dr. Henry Hemsted MD (d. 1945) of Purewell Hill, Christchurch (Hants) and 2nd, 18 September 1946 in London, Charles Edward Stuart-Prince (b. 1893) (who m1, 1918, Gwladys Mary Harrison), and had issue:
(1.1) Rupert Henry Atcherley Hemsted (b. & d. 1911); born and died Oct-Dec 1911;
(1.2) Elizabeth Gay Atcherley Hemsted (b. 1913), born 10 July 1913; apparently living in 1919 but probably died young;
(1.3) Rupert Henry Rustat Hemsted (1921-44), born 30 May 1921; served in Second World War with RAF Volunteer Reserve and was died in Italy, 18 January 1944; buried in Naples War Cemetery;
(1.4) Penelope Atcherley Hemstead (b. 1922), born 14 July 1922; lived at Dersley, Transvaal (South Africa); married, before 1948, Owen Deane and had issue one son;
(1.5) William Richard Tobias Hemsted (b. 1924), born 8 October 1924; married Margaret Evangeline Stratford (1920-2012) and had issue one son and one daughter.
She inherited the Marton Hall estate from her father in 1895 and came of age in 1911. She sold the estate soon afterwards.
She died in South Africa, 17 May 1978. Her first husband died at Naivasha (Kenya), 15 December 1945. Her second husband's date of death is unknown.

Sources

Burke's Landed Gentry, 1952, pp. 71-72; J. Newman & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Shropshire, 2006, p. 137; A. Ruscoe, Landed Estates and the Gentry in North Shropshire: vol. 9, Whitchurch, Wem and Baschurch, 2009, pp. 27-29; http://www.myddle.net/history/myddlehistoryproject/Original%20Document%20pages%2095%20-%20108.pdfhttp://www.atcherley.org.uk/wp/welcome/;


Location of archives


No significant archive is known to survive, but there are many documents referring to the family scattered across family and solicitors' collections at Shropshire Archives.


Coat of arms


Gules on a fesse engrailed argent between three griffin's heads erased or, as many crosses pattée fitchy sable.


Can you help?
Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.
  • Can anyone provide a plan or additional photographs of Marton Hall, before or after the early 20th century rebuilding? Any interior views of either house would be especially welcome.


Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 17th August 2016. I wish to record my indebtedness to the Atcherley One Name Study website: http://www.atcherley.org.uk.

Thursday, 11 August 2016

(224) Astrey of Harlington Woodend and Henbury Great House

Astrey of Harlington and Henbury
The founder of the Astrey family fortunes was Sir Ralph Astrey (d. 1494), who came from Hitchin (Herts) and went to London in the mid 15th century as apprentice to Sir William Hampton, citizen and fishmonger, and Lord Mayor of London in 1472. Astrey became his master's partner and in due course his executor too, and in 1493-94 he also served as Lord Mayor. He died a few days after leaving office, leaving a young widow with an infant son, and also three older sons by his first wife. He left extensive property; an estate at Hitchin which was entailed on his eldest (and only adult) son, William Astrey (d. 1501), lands at All Hallows, Hoo (Kent), entailed on his second son, Ralph Astrey (d. 1501), and scattered estates in Kent and Surrey which were left in trust for his widow, with remainder to his four sons in turn. The properties left to William and Ralph devolved on their deaths without issue to the third brother, Thomas Astrey (d. 1518), and then to his son, William Astrey (1503-42) of Stoke Goldington (Bucks), and it was he who ultimately inherited the Kent and Surrey estates Sir Ralph left to his widow when she died in 1523. William had only one son, Thomas Astry, who sold the Kent properties he had inherited in 1549 and soon afterwards died unmarried. His heir was his father's half-brother, Ralph Astrey (d. 1585), with whom the genealogy below begins. He had bought the Woodend estate at Harlington (Beds) in 1548 and enlarged it and purchased the freehold a few years later, no doubt on receiving his inheritance from his nephew.

Ralph Astrey (d. 1585) was succeeded at Harlington by his son, Ralph Astrey (d. 1599), who was comfortably settled in a house at Everton (Beds) and chose never to move from there. Foreseeing this possibility. the father requested in his will that if Ralph junior chose not to live at Harlington he should allow his younger brother, George (fl. 1609) - who inherited his father's lands in south Bedfordshire - to do so, but George bought a house at Eaton Socon on the Huntingdonshire border and lived there. 

The younger Ralph's heir in 1599 was his eldest son, Sir Henry Astrey (1577-1630), kt., who did live at Harlington. We have no evidence at all that he altered or rebuilt the house at Woodend, but it seems likely that he did as expectations of domestic comfort were rising rapidly at this time and the old house had been out of use for a generation. When Sir Henry died his sons were all minors, and the eldest did not long survive his father, so the property came to Francis Astrey (1617-59), who came of age just before the Civil War. Francis seems to have avoided a strong endorsement of either party in the war, and was appointed to minor local offices by both the King and by Parliament. After his younger brother Henry was driven out of his benefice in Co. Derry, he was particularly involved in raising funds to support the Cromwellian army in Ireland. He died just before the Restoration of the Monarchy and was succeeded by his young son, Sir James Astrey (1653-1709), kt., who became a prominent lawyer in London. He was High Sheriff in 1682 and was appointed as a Master in Chancery and knighted the following year. He was forthright in his support for religious toleration, and these views commended him to King James II, who made him a Deputy Lieutenant for Bedfordshire and a Gentleman of the Privy Chamber. He seems, however, to have avoided any military support for the Stuart cause and he kept his Chancery post after the revolution of 1688, only resigning in 1694 to devote himself to antiquarian and literary pursuits.

Sir James died in 1709 and was succeeded by his eldest son, James Astrey (1675-1716), who secured for himself a nice lucrative post as Secretary of the Comptrollers of the Army Accounts in 1712. However, he died unmarried four years later, and the Harlington Woodend estate passed to his brother, the Rev. Dr. Francis Astrey (1676-1766), a pluralist clergyman who was a Prebendary and Treasurer of St. Paul's Cathedral and must therefore have lived chiefly in London. When Dr. Astrey died without issue at the great age of 90, his property passed to a maternal cousin, Francis Penyston of Cornwell (Oxon) and this branch of the Astrey family died out.

George Astrey (fl. 1609) of Eaton Socon was the founder of another branch of the family. He had six sons, four or five of whom outlived their father, and among whom he distributed the properties he had inherited, bought, and acquired through his marriage. His eldest son, Luke Astrey (1586-1642), rather unusually went into the church and emigrated to Ireland, where he became rector of Drumachose and Tamlaght-Finlagan (Co. Derry). When he died in 1642 he and his wife were buried in Derry Cathedral and he was succeeded in the benefice by his cousin, Rev. Henry Astrey, from the Harlington branch of the family, who was driven out by the rebels a few years later. Luke's surviving children were brought back to England and were bred up to the law. The elder, Luke junior (d. 1708) became a barrister, and inherited some of the family's Huntingdonshire property. The younger, later Sir Samuel Astry (1632-1704), kt., was much more successful, rising to the lucrative post of Clerk of the Crown in the court of King's Bench, which he held from 1677 until his death. Sir Samuel married a Gloucestershire heiress, and bought extensive lands around the core of her family property; he also greatly extended and rebuilt her family house, creating The Great House, Henbury. His two sons, however, he regarded as wastrels, and he did his best to cut them out of his will, leaving them only an allowance for life and providing that if they disputed the will they should lose even that. The elder son predeceased his father, and the younger survived only until 1711. Sir Samuel's widow had his estates for life, but married again and died in December 1708, so that his property was ultimately divided between his three surviving daughters and their husbands.


Harlington Woodend, Bedfordshire


Woodend formed a detached part of the parish of Harlington and a capital messuage here, later called Hardings Place, was leased from the lord of the manor in 1530 by William Harding. In 1538 the lease was extended for a further 31 years, but in 1548 Harding sold it to Ralph Astrey, who also purchased another estate at Woodend from Sir Thomas Cheney shortly afterwards. By 1598, when Ralph Astrey died, the Woodend estate was a freehold, held in chief from the Crown. The family also owned the manor of Wadlowe in Toddington parish, but their main seat was at Harlington Woodend. After a period of disuse at the end of the 16th century, it seems likely that the house was rebuilt or modernised for Sir Henry Astrey (1577-1630), kt., but this is pure speculation. Nothing seems to be known about the appearance or architectural history of the house, which is said to have been burned down in the late 18th or early 19th century and replaced by a farmhouse in which a portion of the old building was said to have been incorporated.

Descent: William Harding sold 1548 to Ralph Astrey (d. 1585); to son, Ralph Astrey (d. 1598); to son, Sir Henry Astrey (1577-1630), kt.; to son, William Astrey (1615-31); to brother, Francis Astrey (1617-59); to son, Sir James Astrey (1653-1709), kt.; to son, James Astrey (1675-1716); to brother, Rev. Dr. Francis Astrey (1677-1766); to maternal kinsman, Francis Penyston of Cornwell (Oxon), who sold before 1808.


Henbury Great House, Gloucestershire


The village of Henbury, five miles from the centre of Bristol and these days part of the built‑up area of the city, has since the 17th century been a favoured place of residence for its wealthier citizens.  Large villas in their own grounds once abounded along the approach roads to the village, although many of them have since been demolished.  Blaise Castle, built in 1795 in a large and famous Repton landscape, now gives the village a conventional squirarchical appearance, and it is easy to forget that before it was built a number of gentry houses contested for pre‑eminence.  In the early 18th century, John Kip drew two views of Henbury, which have been described as masterpieces of tact.  One featured Henbury Awdelett towering above a miniaturised Great House; in the other, the impressive length of the latter dominates the frame and the Awdelett appears as little more than a gardener's cottage.


The street front of the Henbury Great House is seen in the background of Kip's engraving of Henbury Awdelett.
Henbury Great House: Kip's engraving published in 1712 also shows the smaller Henbury Awdelett in the background,
on the left.

There can be little doubt that the Great House was much the larger and more important of the two.  It stood just a few yards back from the crossroads in the centre of Henbury village, where today there is a ruined orchard visible over a low wall.  The property belonged to George Morse in 1629, and in 1688 a man of the same name bequeathed it to his daughter Elizabeth, the wife of Sir Samuel Astry, who had been accumulating property in south Gloucestershire since 1662. As soon as the Great House was in his hands he seems to have begun an extensive remodelling that amounted almost to a rebuilding, and it seems likely that a spirit of rivalry with the neighbouring Sampson family's remodelling of Henbury Awdelett in 1688 may have encouraged the creation of such a grand house.

Kip's views of Henbury show both the main fronts of the Great House, and although one is concerned to maximise and the other to minimise its impact, they agree closely about its size (twelve by three bays) and form.  A low wall with a small summerhouse at either end separated it from the road, on the far side of which a long, angled double avenue leading the eye up to another summerhouse near the top of Blaise Castle hill, the foundations of which can still be found by the determined researcher.  The south façade facing this avenue was 12 bays long and three storeys high, and had a flat roof with a balustraded parapet. Over the central eight bays this parapet was stepped down, but there was otherwise no emphasis of the centre or articulation of the façade. The relentlessness which was evidently the architect's aim in this front was rather spoilt by two off-centre doorways which disturbed the rhythm of the ground floor fenestration.



Henbury Great House: detail of a coloured copy of the Kip engraving.
The north front of the house was the show front, and faced onto a courtyard with a circular pool in the centre, containing a fountain statue of Neptune (which, rather ironically, survives just inside the grounds of Henbury Awdelett (now the Manor House school)).  This side was also of 12 bays, but here the central 10 were battlemented. There was also an excessively complicated rhythm of advance and recession (1‑1‑3‑2‑3‑1‑1 bays) around a central porch but, since the ground floor was again not perfectly symmetrical, this may have been dictated by the desire to incorporate the previous house on the site. This was apparently quite large ‑ it had paid tax on eight hearths in 1672 ‑ and its incorporation would also explain the otherwise extraordinary position of the Great House by the roadside. Nothing is known of the interiors of the house, or of the architect who was responsible for this remarkable amalgam of up‑to‑date Talmanesque composition and pragmatic adaptation; such a compromised design, however, is most likely to have come from the hand of a local Bristol craftsman experimenting with new ideas on a larger than usual canvas.

Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the Great House was its roof. Two small pepper‑pot turrets, presumably approached by twin staircases, gave access to the leads, and broad flights of steps accommodated the change in level caused by the lowered balustrade over the centre of the south front. It was therefore possible to circumambulate the house at roof level, and enjoy the vistas up to Blaise hill and across the gardens north of the house. Roof access of this type is apparent in several of Kip's views, but at Henbury Great House it reached its greatest extent.

Henbury Great House in 1809, shortly before demolition, from a watercolour painting

Sir Samuel Astry died in 1704, and his widow married Simon Harcourt but died shortly afterwards, in 1708. On her death, the estate passed to the Astrys' three surviving daughters, one of whom, Arabella, became Countess of Suffolk and lived in the house for a few years.  After she died in 1722, the estate passed to the Smyths of Ashton Court (one of whom had married another Astry daughter).  In the 1740s or 1750s the house was painted by Thomas Robins, the limner of Bath, but the picture has not been seen since c.1960, when it was at Bramshill in Hampshire (though a Robins pencil sketch of the village of Henbury is known).  By the mid 18th century the break-up of the estate was underway.  Blaise Hill was sold to Thomas Farr, who in 1762 built the Gothick castle on it that stands today; and in 1764 Sir Jarret Smith sold the house with very little land to a Bristol merchant called Michael Miller.  He lived in the house and used it extensively for entertaining, but on his death in 1785 it again passed to three co‑heiresses.  In 1792 it was sold to Henry Brooke, and for some years was run as a boarding school for young ladies; a drawing made at this time shows that it had not materially altered since Kip’s engraving was drawn.  It was then bought by another Bristol merchant called Thomas Stock, who built a villa - later called Henbury Court - a little to the north, and in 1809 the Great House was finally demolished.

Descent: George Morse (fl. 1629)....George Morse (d. 1688); to daughter, Elizabeth (d. 1708), wife of Sir Samuel Astry (1632-1704), kt. and later of Simon Harcourt (1653-1724); to daughter, Arabella (d. 1722), wife of William (d. 1721/2), Earl of Suffolk; to brother-in-law, Sir John Smyth (d. 1726); to son, John Smyth, who sold 1730 to brother-in-law, Sir Jarret Smith, 1st bt., who sold 1764 to Michael Miller (d. 1785); to daughters, who sold 1792 to Henry Francis Brooke; sold to Thomas Stock, who demolished it in 1809.


Astrey family of Harlington


Astrey, Ralph (d. 1585). Son of Thomas Astrey (d. 1518) of Hitchin (Herts) and his wife Joan Pigott, born about 1515. He married, 1545 (licence 17 January 1544/5), Alice (d. 1561), daughter of Thomas Wilsford, gent., of London and widow of Thomas Rotherham (d. 1543) of Luton (Beds), and had issue (with two other daughters, who died in his lifetime, and whose names are lost):
(1) Ralph Astry (d. 1598) (q.v.);
(2) Mary Astry; married 1st, Francis Markham (d. by 1584) and had no issue; married 2nd, as his first wife, Benjamin Pigott (c.1551-1606) of Gravenhurst (Beds) (who m2, Anne, daughter and co-heir of Thomas Wiseman, and 3rd, Bridget, daughter of John Needham of Wymondley (Herts)) and had issue one son (who died young); died before 1584 and was buried at Gravenhurst, where her husband and his three wives are commemorated by a tomb;
(3) Frances Astry; married Peter Mallory of Shelton (Beds) and had issue two sons and three daughters; living in 1584;
(4) Alice Astry; married John Markham (d. 1597) of King's Walden (Herts) and had issue three sons and four daughters; living in 1584;
(5) Ann Astry (fl. 1585); married John Walleys;
(6) George Astry (fl. 1609) of Eaton Socon [for whom see below, Astrey family of Henbury].
He purchased the Harlington Woodend estate in 1548 and enlarged it a few years later. At some point after 1549 he inherited from his half-brother's son, Thomas Astrey, the scattered properties bequeathed by Sir Ralph Astrey, kt. to his widow and children in 1494.
He died 12 January 1584/5; his will was proved 5 February 1584/5. His wife died 2 March 1560/1 and an inquisition post mortem was held 1 December 1561.

Astrey, Ralph (d. 1598). Elder son of Ralph Astrey (d. 1585) and his wife Alice, daughter of Thomas Wilsford, gent., of London, and widow of Thomas Rotherham of Luton (Beds), born about 1550. He married, before 1575, Elizabeth (fl. 1630), daughter of Peter Gray of Ridgmont (Beds) and had issue:
(1) Sir Henry Astrey (1577-1630), kt. (q.v.);
(2) Ralph Astrey (c.1578-1654) of Little Milton (Oxon); inherited property at Leagrave (Beds) and in London from his father; married, before 1614, Anne [surname unknown] and had issue six sons and two daughters; he and his wife were presented as non-communicants in 1616 and may have been Roman Catholics; buried at Milton, 6 December 1654; his will proved 29 December 1654;
(3) Anne Astrey (d. c.1621); married [forename unknown] Threele (d. before 1622) but had no surviving issue; administration of goods granted 31 January 1621/2;
(4) Mary Astrey (d. by 1598); living in 1584.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his father in 1585, but never moved there from his copyhold house at Everton.
He died at Everton (Beds), 7 August 1598 and was buried at Harlington; his will was proved 25 January 1598/9, and an inquisition post mortem was held 7 December 1599. His widow was living in 1630 but her date of death is unknown.

Astrey, Sir Henry (1577-1630), kt. Elder son of Ralph Astrey (d. 1598) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Gray of Ridgmont (Beds), born 24 February 1576/7. Educated at King's College, Cambridge (matriculated c.1590; BA 1593/4). He was knighted by King Charles I at Ampthill, 23 July 1627. He married, 1 June 1611, Mary (fl. 1635), daughter of William St. John of Bletsoe (Beds) and had issue:
(1) Henry Astrey (b. & d. 1613), baptised 2 November 1613; died in infancy and was buried the following day;
(2) William Astrey (1615-31), made a ward of the King at his father's death; died unmarried while still a minor and was buried at Harlington, 18 December 1631; an inquisition post mortem was held 20 November 1632;
(3) Anne Astrey (1616-97), baptised at Harlington, 25 July 1616; married 1st, 16 May 1635, Thomas Peart, later a Colonel in the Royalist army, son of James Peart of St Giles-in-the-Fields, Holborn (Middx), and had issue three daughters; married 2nd, 16 July 1659 at St Bride, Fleet St., London, Robert Anderson (1609-88) of Chichester (Sussex), barrister-at-law of Lincoln's Inn, son of Richard Anderson of Pendley Manor (Herts); her will was proved 4 October 1697;
(4) Francis Astrey (1617-59) (q.v.);
(5) Barbara Astrey (1619-49), baptised at Harlington, 28 November 1619; married 1st, 15 December 1641 at Croydon (Surrey), Michael Miller and had issue one son; married 2nd, 30 April 1646 at St Bartholomew the Less, London, Richard Cooper of Titsey (Surrey); administration of her goods granted 14 February 1648/9;
(6) Rev. Henry Astrey (c.1620-c.1647); educated at Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1638) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1640); ordained and succeeded his kinsman, Luke Astrey as rector of Ballykelly (technically Drumachose and Tamlaght-Finlagan) (Co. Derry), c.1642, but when the Civil War broke out he was driven from his benefice and his goods were plundered by rebels; he married and had issue one son (who was left an orphan at 14 and petitioned the Chancellor of Cambridge University to obtain for him 'a competent livelihood for his progression in learning'); died by 1648;
(7) Mary Astrey (1623-89), baptised at Harlington, 9 March 1622/3; died unmarried and was buried at Harlington, 12 May 1689.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his father in 1598.
He died 25 April 1630. His will was proved 21 June 1630 and an inquisition post mortem was held, 6 Charles I. His widow was living in 1635.

Astrey, Francis (1617-59). Second son of Sir Henry Astrey (1577-1630), kt., and his wife Mary, daughter of William St. John of Bletsoe (Beds), baptised at Harlington, 30 November 1617. He was made a ward of the King after his elder brother's death in 1631. He served as a commissioner in Bedfordshire for the King in the 1640s and for Parliament in the 1650s, and seems to have avoided taking sides in the Civil War. He married, 28 September 1637 at Quainton (Bucks), Dorothy (1613-64), daughter of Sir Fleetwood Dormer, kt. of Lee Grange, Quainton, and had issue:
(1) Francis Astrey (b. 1638), baptised at Harlington, 11 November 1638; died in the lifetime of his father;
(2) Mary Astrey; married, 22 September 1659 at Harlington, [forename unknown] Rawlins;
(3) Dorothy Astrey (fl. 1663); unmarried in 1663;
(4) Sir James Astrey (1653-1709), kt. (q.v.);
(5) Dormer Astrey (1657-59), baptised 27 August 1657; died young and was buried at Harlington, 20 December 1659.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his elder brother in 1631.
He died at Toddington (Beds), 14 May and was buried at Harlington, 19 May 1659; his will was proved 9 June 1659. His widow died at Hadley near Barnet (Middx) and was buried at Harlington, 5 May 1664.

Astrey, Sir James (1653-1709), kt. Elder son of Francis Astrey (1617-59) and his wife Dorothy, daughter of Sir Fleetwood Dormer, kt. of Lee Grange, Quainton (Bucks), born 14 October and baptised 16 October 1653. Educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1671; BCL 1677) and Lincolns Inn (called to bar, 1683). Barrister-at-law; Master in Chancery, 1683-94; knighted, 20 November 1683. High Sheriff of Bedfordshire, 1682. A Gentleman of the Privy Chamber to King James II, 1685. He retired from the law in 1694 and devoted the remaining fifteen years of his life to literary and antiquarian pursuits. He married, 9 October 1673 at Cornwell (Oxon), Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Penyston, 3rd bt. of Cornwell, and had issue:
(1) James Astrey (1675-1716) (q.v.);
(2) Rev. Dr. Francis Astrey (1677-1766) (q.v.);
(3) Robert Astrey (b. 1678), baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster (Middx), 29 May 1678; probably died young;
(4) Penyston Astrey (1680-1742), baptised at Harlington, 9 July 1680; collector of excise in Surrey by 1718; died unmarried, 1742;
(5) Anne Astrey (1682-1760), baptised 20 July 1682; died unmarried and was buried at Harlington; will proved 26 June 1760.
(6) Henrietta Astrey (d. 1754); married, 1 July 1732, Sir Thomas Hatton (d. 1733), 6th bt. of Longstanton (Cambs), but had no issue; buried at Longstanton, where she was commemorated by a monument removed in 1891; her will was proved 26 April 1754;
(7) Elizabeth Astrey (1687-1700), baptised 6 November 1687; died young and was buried 13 June 1700 at St John, Hampstead (Middx);
(8) Mary Astrey (b. & d. 1689), baptised 29 April 1689; died in infancy and was buried at Harlington, 12 May 1689;
(9) Charlotte Astrey (b. 1692), baptised 2 August 1692 at St. Andrew Holborn (Middx); died young.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his father in 1659 and came of age in 1674.
He was buried at Harlington, 15 November 1709. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Astrey, James (1675-1716). Eldest son of Sir James Astrey (1653-1709), kt. and his wife Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Penyston, bt. of Cornwell (Oxon), born 1675. Educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1691). Secretary of the Comptrollers of the Army Accounts, 1712-16. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his father in 1709.
He died aged 41 and was buried at Harlington, 19 October 1716, where he is commemorated by a monumental inscription; he died intestate and a grant of administration was issued to his brother, 9 November 1716.

Astrey, Rev. Dr. Francis (1676-1766). Second son of Sir James Astrey (1653-1709), kt. and his wife Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Penyston, bt. of Cornwell (Oxon), born in London, 24 August 1676 and baptised at St Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster (Middx), 4 September 1676. Educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1692; BA 1695/6; MA 1702; BD and DD 1715); Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, 1698/9. Ordained deacon, 1703 and priest, 1705; Rector of Cornwell (Oxon), 1705-16. Domestic Chaplain to the Bishop of London, 1714. Rector of St Martin, Ludgate Hill, London, 1714-17; Treasurer of St. Paul's Cathedral, London, 1715-66; Prebendary of St. Paul's, 1718-66; Rector of Orsett (Essex), 1717-66 and St James, Garlickhythe, London, 1720-66. He married Susan(na) (d. 1757), daughter of Thomas Walklate of London, but had no issue.
He inherited the Harlington Woodend estate from his elder brother in 1716 and in 1742 he inherited the entailed estates of St. John Astry of Henbury in Huntingdonshire and Lincolnshire. At his death, he bequeathed all his estates to his maternal cousin, Francis Penyston of Cornwell (Oxon).
He died 30 October 1766 and was buried with his wife at Westoning (Beds), 7 November 1766; his will was proved 10 November 1766. His wife was buried at Westoning, 19 February 1757; her will was proved 25 February 1757. The couple are both commemorated by large black marble slabs in the chancel floor at Westoning.


Astrey family of Henbury



Astrey, George (fl. 1609), of Eaton Socon (Beds). Younger son of Ralph Astrey (d. 1585) and his wife Alice, daughter of Thomas Wilsford, gent., of London, and widow of Thomas Rotherham of Luton (Beds), born about 1555. Educated at Clare and Pembroke Colleges, Cambridge (matriculated 1573; BA 1576/7). He married, Lora, daughter of Thomas Rowley of Huntingdonshire and had issue:
(1) Rev. Luke Astrey (1586-1642) (q.v.);
(2) George Astrey (fl. 1603); educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (matriculated 1603); died without issue;
(3) Jane Astrey (fl. 1647); married, 1 November 1609 at Eaton Socon, William Sanderson (d. 1648) of Tempsford (Beds) and had issue two sons and one daughter;
(4) St. John Astrey (1593-1660), baptised at Eaton Socon, 15 October 1593; inherited lands in Huntingdonshire and Lincolnshire from his mother's family; married Judith [surname unknown] (fl. 1660), but had no issue; buried at Holywell (Hunts), 18 May 1660; will proved 19 July 1660;
(5) Mary Astrey (b. 1595), baptised at Eaton Socon, 26 June 1595; died in infancy;
(6) Robert Astrey (b. & d. 1596), baptised at Eaton Socon, 13 July 1596; died in infancy and was buried at Eaton Socon, 10 December 1596;
(7) Mary Astrey (b. & d. 1598), baptised at Eaton Socon, 1 October 1598; died in infancy and was buried at Eaton Socon, 25 December 1598;
(8) Henry Astrey (b. 1600), baptised at Eaton Socon, 15 June 1600;
(9) John Astrey (1601-30/1), baptised at Eaton Socon, 24 January 1601/2; inherited his father's lands in Nether Staploe, Eaton Socon and acquired a plantation on St Kitts; he died unmarried en voyage to St. Kitts in 1630 or 1631 and was probably buried at sea; his will was proved 19 January 1630/1, but a later will to different effect having been found subsequently was proved 16 May 1633 occasioning much litigation and dissension within the family;
(10) James Astrey (c.1603-79), baptised at Eaton Socon, 16/17 October 1603; merchant in London; married, 28 July 1633 at St Bride, Fleet St., London, Diana (d. 1682), daughter of Edward Bee of London, gent., but had no issue; buried at St Helen, Bishopsgate, London, 23 January 1678/9; will proved 20 January 1678/9;
(11) Judith Astrey (b. 1605), baptised at Eaton Socon, 7 August 1605;
(12) Grace Astrey (b. 1606), baptised at Eaton Socon, 20 October 1606; 
(13) Ralph Astrey (1609-44), baptised at Eaton Socon, 22 October 1609; married Grace, daughter of Edward Buckworth of Wisbech (Cambs), and had issue one daughter; inherited lands at Braytoft (Lincs) from his brother John; buried at Eaton Socon, 28 May 1644.
He inherited £400 and his father's lands in Caddington, Luton, Dunstable and Kensworth in south Bedfordshire and north Hertfordshire. He lived at Eaton Socon. 
His date of death is unknown.

Astrey, Rev. Luke (1586-1642). Eldest son and heir of George Astrey (fl. 1606) of Eaton Socon (Beds) and his wife Lora, daughter of Thomas Rowley of Huntingdonshire, baptised at Eaton Socon, 4 May 1586. Educated at Queen's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1604; BA 1606/7; MA 1610); his degrees were incorporated at Oxford, 1611. He took holy orders and went to Ireland, where he was described as 'a very good preacher and a good scoller'. He was rector of Drumachose and Tamlaght-Finlagan (Co. Derry), 1622-42. He married Anne Cullen, and had issue:
(1) Luke Astrey (d. 1708); educated at Lincolns Inn (admitted 1649/50; called to bar; bencher, 1675; Treasurer, 1680); barrister-at-law; inherited the property of his uncle St John Astrey in Huntingdonshire and Lincolnshire; died unmarried, 16 June 1708; administration of his goods with will annexed being granted, 26 June 1708;
(2) James Astrey; perhaps died young;
(3) Anne Astrey; perhaps died young;
(4) Sir Samuel Astry (1632-1704), kt. (q.v.);
He died in 1642 and was buried in Derry Cathedral, 24 May 1642, with his wife.

Astry, Sir Samuel (1632-1704), kt. Younger son of Rev. Luke Astrey (1586-1642) and his wife, born 1632. Normally spelled his surname without an 'e'.  Educated at Clements Inn (called to bar). Barrister-at-law; Joint Coroner and Attorney in the Court of Queen's Bench, 1667-1716; Clerk of the Crown in the Court of King's Bench, 1677-1704; Prothonotary and Clerk of the Crown in the counties of Carmarthen, Pembroke, Cardigan and Haverfordwest, and borough of Carmarthen. DL for Gloucestershire, 1687/8. He married, 1667, Elizabeth, daughter of George Morse of Henbury (Glos) and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Astry (1669-1715), baptised at Henbury, 30 September 1669; married, 11/16 August 1692 at Henbury, Sir John Smith MP (c.1659-1726), 2nd bt. of Ashton Court (Somerset) and had issue three sons and four daughters; died 15 September 1715;
(2) Diana Astry (1670-1716), baptised at Henbury, 2 January 1670/1; married, 17 December 1708 at Lincolns Inn Chapel, Richard Orlebar (d. 1733) but had no issue; her husband inherited Hinwick House (Beds), which they rebuilt in 1710-14; she is known for the recipe book she compiled before and after her marriage, which has been published by the Bedfordshire Historical Records Society; she died 4 September 1716 and was buried at Podington (Beds);
(3) Anne Astry (c.1672-1703); married, 1693 (settlement 7 March) Thomas Chester (d. 1705) of Knole Park, Almondsbury (Glos) and had issue five sons and three daughters; died in childbirth and was buried at Almondsbury, 6 August 1703;
(4) Luke Astry (1673-1701), baptised at Henbury, 25 June 1673; educated at Hart Hall, Oxford (matriculated 1690) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1692); regarded by his father as a wastrel, he is said to have drunk himself to death; he died in the lifetime of his father, 7 May 1701;
(5) St. John Astry (1674-1711), baptised at Henbury, 24 July 1674; described as 'extravagant, intemperate, idle and vicious', his father left him only an annuity of 400 marks a year, and by 1708 he was so heavily indebted that he bought out this annuity to discharge of his debts; the same year he inherited the estate of his uncle, Luke Astrey (d. 1708); he died unmarried and without issue and was buried at Henbury, 21/27 November 1711;
(6) Arabella Astry (1684-1722), baptised at Henbury, 6 September 1684; occupied the Great House after the death of her mother in 1708; married, 1715 (settlement 10 June and licence 9 July), Charles William Howard (1693-1722), 7th Earl of Suffolk & 2nd Earl of Bindon, but had no issue; died 23 June 1722 and was buried at Henbury.
He purchased the manor of Aust in 1662 and the Henbury manorial estate in 1675 and 1680. In 1688 he acquired the Great House in right of his wife, and remodelled it. He also acquired other lands at Westerleigh and elsewhere in south Gloucestershire. At his death he bequeathed his estate to his wife for life with remainder to his surviving daughters.
He died 25 September 1704 and was buried at Aust, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved 1 November 1704; a grant of administration of part of his estate left unadministered was issued to his surviving daughters, 16 December 1709. His widow married 2nd, 22 July 1707, Simon Harcourt (1653-1724) of Pendley Manor (Herts), Master of the Crown Office, but had no further issue; she died in December 1708; administration of her goods was granted 12 January 1708/9.



Sources


Sir R. Atkyns, The ancient and present state of Glostershire, 1712, pls. following pp. 472, 474; R.E.C. Waters, Genealogical memoirs of the families of Chester and Astry, 1881, passim; F.A. Page-Turner, Genealogica Bedfordiensis, 1890, passimL.J. Upton Way, The owners of the Great House, Henbury, 1910, p. 8; T. Mowl & B. Earnshaw, ‘The garden ghost of the Great House of Henbury’, Glos & Avon Life, June 1981, pp. 64-65; D. Layzell, Invitation to Henbury, 1984, p. 25; 


Location of archives


Astry family of Harlington: memorandum book of Ralph Astrey (d. 1598) [Bedfordshire Archives & Records Service, X509]
Astry family of Henbury: deeds and papers, 17th-18th cents. [Bristol Record Office, AC/AS]


Coat of arms


Barry wavy argent and azure a chief gules with three bezants therein.


Can you help?


Here are a few notes about information and images which would help to improve the account above. If you can help with any of these or with other additions or corrections, please use the contact form in the sidebar to get in touch.

  • Is anyone able to provide more information about the house at Harlington Woodend, or an illustration of it?
  • Does anyone know what happened to the Thomas Robins painting of Henbury Great House, last recorded at Bramshill (Hants) in about 1960?
  • Does anyone know more about the fate of Rev. Henry Astrey, ejected from his living in Co. Derry during the Civil War and apparently dead by 1648, or of his son, the would-be Cambridge scholar?



Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 11th August 2016.